Halloween- Pumpkin Slime

Pumpkin slime, slime, figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, Holiday slime, STEAM, STEM Science

I got together with some mini scientists/creators and we made Halloween inspired pumpkin slime.  Tis the season!  It is important to have an air tight container for your slime.  Why not make it super cute and fall themed?

What you will need for this project:

Making the slime:

  1. Pour glitter glue into mixing bowl.
  2. Pour equal amount of warm water into bowl, stir.
  3. This is where you can add more glitter or food coloring if you wish.  Not necessary, if you already have orange glitter glue.
  4. Add equal amount of liquid starch, stirring the whole time.  (Example 1/4 cup glue, 1/14 cup water, 1/4 cup liquid starch.)
  5. Work with the slime using your hands.  It will get less sticky and easier to handle.  You can always add more liquid starch if it seems to sticky.

Making your pumpkin:

  1. Color a wine cork with green or brown marker.
  2. Hot glue the “stem” onto the container.
  3. Curl a pipe cleaner using a pencil.
  4. Twist around the stem.
  5. Fill with slime.

In the first class, we added styrofoam balls to add texture.  I wouldn’t recommend doing that.  The balls help create a cool texture, but the white stood out, and floated to the top when slime settled.  I do think it may be cool to add some flaxseed for a fun added texture element, if desired.

Pumpkin slime, slime, figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, Holiday slime, STEAM, STEM Science

 

Pumpkin slime, slime, figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, Holiday slime, STEAM, STEM Science
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Halloween,Pumpkin slime, slime, figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, Holiday slime, STEAM, STEM Science

For more Halloween STEAM check out:

Dry Ice Bubble Crystal Ball :: Science Kiddo

Frankenstein’s Frozen Brain Halloween Science Activity :: Little Bins for Little Hands

5 Little Pumpkins STEAM Activity :: Preschool Powol Packets

Shrunken Heads Halloween Science Experiment :: Share It! Science

Tensile Strength Experiment | Find the Strongest Spider Web :: From Engineer to Stay at Home Mom

Halloween STEAM Kids Ebook-Sure to WOW!

Halloween, STEAM Kids, ebook, Figment Creative Labs, Austin TX, Science, Art, kids, slime, kids activities

Would you like to add some spook to your STEAM?  Check out STEAM Kids Halloween E-Book!  50+ pages of spooky fun STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art & Math) activities that will wow the boredom right out of your kids!

Inside you’ll find entertaining and educational projects like:

– Fizzing Pumpkins
– Spider Web Science
– Magic Potions Density Tower
– Milk Jug Skeletons & so much more!

Perfect for children ages 4-10, the step-by-step activities are easy to follow and most use supplies you have already on hand.

So gather up your curious kids and get your Halloween STEAM on!

https://steamkidsbooks.com/pr…/steam-kids-halloween-bundle/…

 

Halloween, STEAM Kids, ebook, Figment Creative Labs, Austin TX, Science, Art, kids, slime, kids activities

Halloween, STEAM Kids, ebook, Figment Creative Labs, Austin TX, Science, Art, kids, slime, kids activities

Spoon Puppets and Creative Play

spoon puppets, creative play, child led art, Figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, puppet show, cardboard box, kid's crafts, Horizon, Craft project

Creative play is essential in the development of a child.  When kids are acting, playing dress up, dancing, or creating visual art, they are experimenting with decision making.  At Figment, that is exactly what I like to promote.  I had a large box left over from a package delivery.  I showed my class the box and then we read Not A Box.  It is an adorable book that shows the endless possibilities of a cardboard box and a child’s imagination.

spoon puppets, creative play, child led art, Figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, puppet show, cardboard box, kid's crafts, Horizon, Craft project

I asked the girls what they thought we should do with the box.  They threw around some ideas, but they weren’t set on one.  I cut a window in the box, thinking it may spark some ideas… and BOOM!  The box instantly became a puppet theater!  The girls were super excited about their discovery and asked to make puppets.  (Another thing I am super into is child led projects, because nothing holds a child’s interest as much as their own ideas.)  So, I got out some kitchen spoons and other Horizon Group art supplies and let them get crafty.  *This may be a good time to say that I am a blog partner with craftprojectideas.com -an awesome resource for craft supplies.  They send me art supplies from time to time and we get to make amazing creative things with them.  You can find many of their supplies at Walmart labeled Horizon Group, in the craft section.  You can also see more craft ideas at http://craftprojectideas.com.

spoon puppets, creative play, child led art, Figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, puppet show, cardboard box, kid's crafts, Horizon, Craft project

What we used:

What we did:

  1. Had fun.
  2. Made puppets. We hot glued the “hair” on the puppet spoons and styled.  Later adding fabric for clothes.
  3. Played

 

That’s right, we played, and played, and played.  The girls acted out scenes and giggled and spoke in very high voices.  There were some marriage proposals and fancy princesses.  But over all, there were creative decisions being made and confidence being built.

spoon puppets, creative play, child led art, Figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, puppet show, cardboard box, kid's crafts, Horizon, Craft project

Breaking down Styrofoam using Acetone -Erupting Volcanos and Halloween Science

science experiment, melting styrofoam with acetone, simple kids experiment, Figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, polystyrene, halloween experiment, volcano experiment, cool science

Plastic if left in the ground will take hundreds to thousands of years to break down.  There are a couple of ways that we can break down styrofoam.  We experimented with acetone, erupting volcanos and having some spooky Halloween science fun.  Check it out!

Let’s see if I can explain this experiment better than I did in the video…

What is styrofoam?

Styrofoam is a type of plastic.  It is a kind of expanded polystyrene.  Polystyrene is a polymer made from monomer styrene.  It is made of long strands of styrene molecules with lots of air pockets.

What is acetone?

It is a chemical that acts as a solvent that breaks down polystyrene.  It is most often found in nail polish remover.  (You will need 100% acetone for this project.)

Where can you get it?  Gallon  or just go buy 100% Acetone nail polish remover from Dollar Tree.

What happens?

Acetone dissolves the bonds that hold styrofoam together.  When it is poured on the styrofoam it falls apart, releasing the air, and takes up less space.  The styrofoam is turning back into a liquid.

We had some fun demonstrating this experiment by erupting styrofoam volcanos.

science experiment, melting styrofoam with acetone, simple kids experiment, Figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, polystyrene, halloween experiment, volcano experiment, cool science


We found that painting the cones with Sharpies worked better than paint.  The wet paint and glitter kinda blacked the chemical. Pouring the acetone on, instead of using droppers works best.

This is a great project to do around Halloween!

science experiment, melting styrofoam with acetone, simple kids experiment, Figment Creative Labs, Austin Texas, polystyrene, halloween experiment, volcano experiment, cool science

Since acetone breaks down styrofoam (which we know is bad for the environment)  why don’t we just use acetone to break styrofoam down?  Glad you asked.  Well, acetone isn’t good for the environment either.

What is a natural way to break down styrofoam?  Answer= Mealworms

Make sure you do this activity in a well ventilated area.

 

 

 

Oliver Jeffers Inspired Art Lesson

Oliver Jeffers inspired Art Lesson, Austin Texas, Figment Creative Labs, book illustration workshop, kid's art, dipped paintings

In art class we often talk about and emulate artists that are no longer with us.  Amazing artists like Picasso, Matisse, Van Gogh …, but what about the artists that write and illustrate the books that we read to our kids everyday?  One of our favorite picture book authors and illustrators is Oliver Jeffers.  You may know him from his books: The Day The Crayons QuitStuck, and The Incredible Book Eating Boy, to name a few.  While Jeffers makes mixed media picture books filled with stories and images equally pleasing and amusing to children and adults, he is also a visual artist with an amazing body of paintings and installation art.  He has a series of art where he focuses on making an image, then taking it away.  It is a study on memory and loss.

The Dipped Painting Project from Oliver Jeffers on Vimeo.

Oliver Jeffers inspired Art Lesson, Austin Texas, Figment Creative Labs, book illustration workshop, kid's art, dipped paintings
I showed the children the video above, where Jeffers explains how his dipped paintings came about and what they symbolize.

The LBJ Presidential Library donated a bunch of prints of paintings of presidents and first ladies to me, to repurpose the canvases.  I saw this as the perfect base to use as a lesson on Oliver Jeffers’ work.  I would like to preface by saying that I would never paint over an original (these are prints), and I would never try to make a political statement with children.  I had each child choose their base.

I find that when teaching a lesson to children, if you can add a hands on activity, the memory of it sticks and stands out as an experience that you are less likely to forget then say a lecture.  In essence, that is what I do at Figment.  My husband, son, and I built a wooden box to hold the paint, caulking the edges to prevent leakage.

Oliver Jeffers inspired Art Lesson, Austin Texas, Figment Creative Labs, book illustration workshop, kid's art, dipped paintings
I had the children write down a memory, then the paintings dripped onto that memory as part of the art experience.

I knew that there would be some children that wanted to use other colors, so I gave them the spray paint option.

Oliver Jeffers inspired Art Lesson, Austin Texas, Figment Creative Labs, book illustration workshop, kid's art, dipped paintings

We used painter’s tape and paper to cover the tops of the portraits.  If I did this again, I would have them use tape over the whole top, to make sure no spray got on it.

It was really interesting to see some of the kid’s variations on the project.

We got so into dipping stuff!  We made small drawings and framed them with magnetic locker frames that I found at Hobby Lobby and made mini dip paintings.

Oliver Jeffers inspired Art Lesson, Austin Texas, Figment Creative Labs, book illustration workshop, kid's art, dipped paintings

Oliver Jeffers writes and illustrates his picture books at the same time, so that is what we did.  I gave the kids each a blank white bound book (found at Target).  I stock up on them whenever I find them in the $3.00 bins.  I talked with the kids about the important parts of a book- the beginning, the middle, and the end.  As well as the elements of a story- characters, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution.  Then I really just let them get to it.  It was wonderful to see the kids around the table discussing their main characters, and what they had in mind for them.  Dragons, fairies, and ninjas seemed to be the main themes throughout.

Oliver Jeffers inspired Art Lesson, Austin Texas, Figment Creative Labs, book illustration workshop, kid's art, dipped paintings

At the end of the class I gave each child a tiny composition book (from Dollar Tree)to keep on them, since you never know when you are going to get an idea.

I hope this art lesson inspires more future artists and picture book authors and illustrators in the world.  Do you love Oliver Jeffers?  I would love to hear all about it in the comments below.  Thanks, Ms Amber